The 25th Annual Science Fair at Rick Marcotte Central School, organized by Scott and Bobbe Pennington since its inception, drew a big crowd April 16. 


RMCS Students’ Science Projects: 25th Annual Science Fair Displays Creativity and Interests of Student Body

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Thursday May 08, 2014

Over 125 students displayed science projects at the Rick Marcotte Central School (RMCS) Science Fair on the evening of April 16. Guests strolling the aisles of the busy fair saw demonstrations of how ants tunnel, how fingers bend, and how paperclips can be turned into magnets. They saw a molecule made of gumdrops, a red-eared spider, Petri dishes with household germs, a penny corroding in soda, a homemade air conditioner, and models of volcanoes, zebras, and geysers.

The Science Fair was started 25 years ago by Scott and Bobbe Pennington, when their children were students at RMCS. Scott, a science teacher at Essex High School, and Bobbe, a 5th grade teacher at RMCS, wanted to provide students with an opportunity to explore topics of their own choosing in a non-competitive environment. Their own children are all grown up now, but the Penningtons continue to organize the event every year. 

Students from Kindergarten to 5th grade took part in the Science Fair, even though only 5th graders were required to participate. Some students presented topical information while others employed the scientific method in a research study. The Payson siblings--Oliver (Kindergarten) and Lucy (3rd grade)--began their cookie taste test with a hypothesis: “I think the one with the most fat will taste best.” They collected data in neat columns and presented the conclusion that 5 grams of fat beat 2 grams of fat in flavor. 

Just down the street during the same week, the University of Vermont was holding its student research conference, with poster sessions that looked very similar to RMCS’s event… it’s just a few steps from a gumdrop molecule to a nano-particle!

SOURCE: Michelle Rosowsky, Rick Marcotte Central School PTO